Stevia

Food Type:
Age Suggestion: 24 months +
Nutrition Rating:How nutritious a food is with a focus on the specific nutrients babies need for optimal growth. The more nutritious a food, the more stars it will have.
Prep Time:How much time a food takes to prepare safely for a baby. The more time-consuming a food is to prepare safely, the more clocks it will have.
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Common Allergen: No
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a pile of powdered stevia

Warning

While research is lacking on the long-term health effects of stevia on young children, stevia can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, and other symptoms in adults. It is our opinion that it is best to wait to introduce stevia until age 2 and even then to limit the amount offered.

When can babies have stevia?

While it is considered safe to introduce certain stevia extracts after baby’s first birthday, it is our strong opinion that it is best to hold off on introducing the sweetener until after 24 months of age for two reasons. First, research is lacking on the long-term health effects for children consuming stevia. Second, in excess, any sweeteners in a baby or toddler’s diet can reduce the diversity of foods the child is interested in eating.1 If you want to sweeten baby’s food, consider using fresh fiber-containing fruits, such as banana, figs, strawberries, or another naturally sweet fruit.

About stevia

Stevia rebaudiana, or ka’a he’e, is a shrub native to a very small region in South America with leaves that contain glycosides (naturally sweet, sugar-free botanical compounds). While stevia has only become more widely available in the United States in the last few decades, the indigenous Guarani people have used the stevia plant as a sweetener, as well as for medicinal and ceremonial purposes, for centuries. Now grown world-wide, stevia is often available at local garden centers as an herb you can grow at home. The leaves of the stevia plant are processed into liquid or powder extracts of steviol glycosides that are 200-400 times sweeter than sucrose, or table sugar.2 In the US, only the purified extract is approved as a food additive sweetener (not the whole leaf), but it has remained a popular sugar alternative because of its natural origins.3

Is stevia safe for babies?

It’s unclear. While purified steviol glycoside extract is generally recognized as safe by the FDA, more research is needed on the long-term impacts of stevia on babies and young children. And even for adults, large amounts of steviol glycosides can cause headaches, dizziness, numbness, and nausea, as well as decreased appetite in some individuals.4 5 6

For children older than 12 months of age, it’s generally accepted to be okay to offer a small amount of sweetened food, though waiting to offer sugar and other sweeteners until the 2nd birthday is ideal.

Is stevia a common choking hazard for babies?

No. Stevia itself is not a common choking hazard, though the foods it is in certainly can be. As always, make sure you create a safe eating environment and stay within an arm’s reach of baby during meals.

For more information on choking, visit our sections on gagging and choking and familiarize yourself with the list of common choking hazards.

Is stevia a common allergen?

No. Allergies to stevia are rare but have been reported.7 However, the already low rate of documented reactions to stevia decreased significantly after 2008, when highly purified stevia products became more commonly available. People who are allergic to ragweed pollen and individuals with Oral Allergy Syndrome (also known as pollen-food allergy) may be hypersensitive to stevia.8 Oral Allergy Syndrome typically results in short-lived itching and burning in the mouth and is unlikely to result in a dangerous reaction.9

How do you introduce stevia to babies with baby-led weaning?

6 to 12 months old: Avoid.

12 to 24 months old: Avoid. Research suggests that the use of sugar alternatives may negatively impact a child’s taste reception, which could affect willingness to try new foods.10

24 months old and up: Once you’ve considered the impact of sweeteners on a child’s diet and read up on the potential side effects above, consider adding scant amounts of stevia to caffeine-free herbal teas, baked goods, and other foods. The recommended maximum daily amount of steviol glycosides considered safe by the FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives is 4 mg per kg body weight daily.11

Check out our FAQ on Cup Drinking for help developing baby’s skills with open cups and straws.

Recipe: Tea for Toddlers

a small glass of tea between a tea bag and a spoon with a small amount of liquid in it

Yield: ¾ cup (177 milliliters)
Cooking Time: 5 minutes
Age: 24 months+

Ingredients

  • 1 caffeine-free tea bag (i.e., chamomile, mint, lavender, lemon balm)
  • ¾ cup (177 milliliters) hot water
  • 2 tablespoons (30 milliliters) whole milk (or any non-dairy milk)
  • 1/16 teaspoon (.25 grams) stevia

This recipe contains common allergens: dairy (optional). Only serve after dairy has been introduced safely.

Directions

  1. Place tea bag in the child’s cup. Cover with hot water and let the tea bag steep for 2 minutes.
  2. Remove tea bag and stir in the milk and stevia.
  3. Serve: Serve the tea in an open-lidded mug. This is a fun opportunity to work on the skill of drinking from an open cup. Just be sure that the tea is warm, not hot, when serving.

To Store: You can refrigerate and reheat the tea the following day or day after if desired.

Flavor Pairings

On its own, stevia has a sweet flavor that builds more slowly than table sugar and a slightly bitter aftertaste. As such, stevia’s sweetness pairs well with bitter drinks like tea and coffee, tangy dairy products like yogurts and smoothies, and other strong flavors like chocolate, pineapple, and mint.

Reviewed by

E. Cerda, MSN, CNS, LDN

A. Gilbaugh, RD, CNSC

K. Grenawitzke, OTD, OTR/L, SCFES, IBCLC, CNT

S. Bajowala, MD, FAAAAI. (allergy section)

R. Ruiz, MD Board-Certified General Pediatrician and Pediatric Gastroenterologist

  1. Fidler Mis, N., Braegger, C., Bronsky, J., Campoy, C., Domellöf, et al. (2017). Sugar in Infants, Children and Adolescents: A Position Paper of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Committee on NutritionJournal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition, 65(6), 681–696. DOI:10.1097/MPG.0000000000001733. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  2. Food and Drug Administration. (2018). Additional Information about High-Intensity Sweeteners Permitted for Use in Food in the United States. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  3. Food and Drug Administration. (2018). Additional Information about High-Intensity Sweeteners Permitted for Use in Food in the United States. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  4. Chan P, Tomlinson B, Chen YJ, et al. (2000). A double-blind placebo-controlled study of the effectiveness and tolerability of oral stevioside in human hypertension. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 50 (3), 215-20. DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2125.2000.00260.x. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  5. Hsieh MH, Chan P, Sue YM, et al. (2003). Efficacy and tolerability of oral stevioside in patients with mild essential hypertension: a two-year, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Clinical Therapeutics, 25 (11), 2797-808. DOI: 10.1016/s0149-2918(03)80334-x. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  6. Farhat G, Berset V, Moore L. (2019). Effects of Stevia Extract on Postprandial Glucose Response, Satiety and Energy Intake: A Three-Arm Crossover Trial. Nutrients,11(12), 3036. DOI: 10.3390/nu11123036. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  7. Kimata, H. (2007). Anaphylaxis by stevioside in infants with atopic eczema. Allergy, 62(5), 565–566. DOI:10.1111/j.1398-9995.2007.01317.x. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  8. Urban, J. D., Carakostas, M. C., & Taylor, S. L. (2015). Steviol glycoside safety: Are highly purified steviol glycoside sweeteners food allergens? Food and Chemical Toxicology: An International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 75, 71–78. DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2014.11.011. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  9. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. (2019). Ragweed Pollen Allergy. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  10. Fidler Mis, N., Braegger, C., Bronsky, J., Campoy, C., Domellöf, et al. (2017). Sugar in Infants, Children and Adolescents: A Position Paper of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Committee on NutritionJournal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition, 65(6), 681–696. DOI:10.1097/MPG.0000000000001733. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  11. Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. Steviol glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni. FAO. Retrieved May 26, 2021.